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Risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia is lower with Latuda

Risk of metabolic syndrome in schizophrenia is lower with Latuda

New research on Latuda® (lurasidone), an atypical antipsychotic agent indicated for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults, has been presented at the Summer Meeting of the British Association for Psychopharmacology (BAP) in Cambridge.

Posted: 25 July 2014

The data show that treatment with LATUDA was associated with a significantly lower risk of metabolic syndrome compared with treatment with risperidone.

LATUDA looks set to be available in August following European Commission Marketing Authorisation in March for the treatment of adults who have schizophrenia. About 1% of the UK population - over 630,000 people - will develop schizophrenia in their lifetime. Schizophrenia is associated with shortened life expectancy of 15-22.5 years, which can in part be due to the undesirable effects of antipsychotics such as weight gain, increased blood pressure and increased blood sugar.

Data presented at the BAP summer meeting by Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Europe show that in a 12-month, multiregional, double-blind study, outpatients with clinically stable schizophrenia were randomized to flexibly dosed, once-daily LATUDA (37-111 mg/day) or risperidone (2-6 mg/day). Patients who completed this study were then eligible to participate in a 6-month, open-label extension study of flexibly dosed LATUDA (37-111 mg/day). Changes in metabolic parameters were evaluated in patients who either continued on LATUDA or were switched from risperidone to LATUDA.

Commenting on the data Professor David Taylor, Director of Pharmacy and Pathology, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, said, ‘Patients with schizophrenia are already at an increased risk for developing metabolic syndrome, which is associated with greater cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality as well as other physical health problems. It is well documented that some antipsychotic treatments have been shown to further compound that risk … We are encouraged to see the results of this study showing lurasidone was associated with a significantly lower risk of metabolic syndrome compared with risperidone’.

Results from the post-hoc analysis found that after 12 months of treatment:

  • The prevalence of metabolic syndrome remained stable in the LATUDA treatment group (31.5%; 47/149), while prevalence increased in the risperidone treatment group (44.1%; 41/93) (p<0.05).
  • Patients without metabolic syndrome at double-blind baseline experienced a greater incidence of metabolic syndrome in the risperidone treatment group compared to the LATUDA treatment group (27.1% for risperidone vs. 16.3% for LATUDA).
  • Patients with metabolic syndrome at double-blind baseline experienced a greater decrease in the prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the LATUDA treatment group compared to the risperidone treatment group (36.7% for LATUDA vs. 28.1% for risperidone).